Colombia's famously fearsome animals

Colombia is one of the world’s most diverse countries and some of our animals are famous across the globe for the impressive power of their venom. Even though Colombia’s most poisonous and predatory creatures tend to dwell deep in the jungle, far from humans, it’s still worth doing everything you can to avoid these critters:

http://www.colombia.co/en/this-is-colombia/environment/colombias-famously-fearsome-animals/

 

Imágenes de un mundo perdido en Colombia

See images

http://www.elespectador.com/noticias/medio-ambiente/imagenes-de-un-mundo-perdido-en-colombia-galeria-690507

 

Why you should go to Colombia now – before it's too late

Guy Kelly 11 February 2017

"What’s really meant when people say it’s ‘the perfect time to go’ is: get there before it’s overrun with Americans in shorts, shops selling ‘I love Colombia’ T-shirts and plastic Irish pubs."

Everybody had the same reaction. ‘Colombia?’ they’d chirp, before giving a sagacious little nod. ‘Perfect time to go, what with the news and that. Get in there early, before everyone else.’

There can be few better national PR boosts than a Nobel Peace Prize. Especially if the rest of the planet has associated your country with murder, cocaine, gangs, kidnapping, corruption – anything other than peace – for as long as anyone can remember. ‘Ladies and gentlemen, there is one less war in the world, and it is the war in Colombia,’ President Juan Manuel Santos told the assembled crowd in Oslo two months ago, as he accepted the honour.

Find out more

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/south-america/colombia/articles/colombia-go-now-before-mass-tourism-arrives/

 

EDITORIAL: Eyes of the Afghan Girl- A critical take on the “Steve McCurry Scandal”

 June 6, 2016  Kshitij Nagar

Steve McCurry has come to India on numerous occasions to photograph. It has a special place in his work and in his life. He has expressed his love for India many times over the years.

It is also the depiction of this place that has attracted him the most criticism, both in India and internationally. He is often accused of depicting a certain stereotypical, exotic, almost “slumdog millionaire-ish” version of India that panders to western audiences. This is a criticism that Teju Cole of the New York Times also levied on McCurry’s recent volume of photographs titled ‘India’ which is a compendium of all the images he made here in between 1978 and 2014. He was also faced with the same criticism on stage at the launch of the same book in New Delhi. Further, in the review of his book, Cole goes on to remark “The pictures are staged or shot to look as if they were.” Again, McCurry was faced by these same questions at that launch event in January, which he chose to ignore then.

Find out more: http://www.writingthroughlight.com/news/editorial-afghan-girl-steve-mccurry/

 

 

NATURE REALLY DOES CLEAR YOUR HEAD.

Apr 11, 2016By Michael W. Pirrone

The great outdoors might just be greater than you think. There are plenty of us who love to spend as many hours of the day outdoors as we can, and hiking is obviously quite healthy for the body, but few of us ever give a lot of thought to how hiking could benefit our mental health as well. It turns out that hiking might just be your ticket to a brand-new brain, whether you’re passionate about the outdoors, or just force yourself to take a stroll around your local park.

Recent studies about the effects of hiking and nature have been directed at understanding just how this recreational activity affects both the physiological and mental aspects of our brains. So, what does this mean for human beings? Well, unless we get a little more proactive about embracing fresh air and dirt under our feet, the prognosis is pretty grim. The bright side is, as with all great medicine, when it comes to the outdoors, a little goes a long way.

Find out more:  http://www.wimp.com/what-hiking-does-to-the-brain-is-pretty-amazing/

What 90,000 indigenous people have to say about climate change

Feb 5, 2016 By Ari Phillips

A new study attempts to inject some anecdotal heft into the science of climate change by collecting observations from more than 90,000 people that historically depended on nature for their traditional way of life. 

Find out more: http://fusion.net/story/296749/study-of-global-indigenous-climate-history/